Desk Treasures

 

Desk AccessoriesIt’s no secret I’m obsessed with white, gold and grey. There’s something so pure and soothing about a cool, neutral palette. Everything looks good on it or against it, and you can have fun mixing different tones and textures. Thanks to 13 years of living in New York City, and an abundance of overseas work travel, I’ve developed an eclectic but minimalist design aesthetic, and apply it to even the most functional items.

My workspace is no exception, and being tucked behind my couch, I wanted it to feel calm, cozy and creative. These are a few of the small indulgences that make doing work from home so much more inviting.

Shown above, from TtB: Fresh blooms in a single stem; Fornasetti cup and saucer; Something pretty to keep notes in, like this gold and cream Lanvin notebook; Carl Aubock jumbo gold paperclip; Set of perfectly sharpened colored pencils in a brass v-holder; Garance Doré for Rifle Paper Co. iPhone case; Magnifying glass by Maison Martin Margiela (I received mine as a gift after staying at Margiela’s hotel in Paris, and just LOVE them); Rifle Paper Co. telephone notecards; Brass Midori pencil case; a decadent candle like Le Labo’s Santal 26; Feather pen from Maison Martin Margiela; Astier de Villatte ceramic dish; John Derian vintage key paper weight.

every picture (re)tells a story

This morning I dropped by Left Bank Books in the West Village and came across a beautiful little book by Wim Wenders called “Places, Strange and Quiet.” I love Wenders’ work and with a title that spoke to my heart, I had to have it.

In the book, Wenders captures forty-four places that are melancholy and silent, yet charged with possibility. Time capsules, as he calls them. Number 9 and 10 are of a ferris wheel in Armenia from 2008. The first portrays a cloudy, calm landscape that is nostalgic and isolated. The second, from the opposite angle is sinister and exposed.  Alongside the fold-out photograph is a brief passage:

“Every picture tells a story…”
Sometimes only the reverse angle 
tells the truth. – Wim Wenders

Every picture tells a story...

06-ferris-wheel-reverse-angle

tonight I feel infinite.

downpour in the west village by meagan kirkpatrick

downpour in the west village by meagan kirkpatrick

I took this photo over a year ago, and it’s still one of my favorites. I didn’t really  know how to use my camera back then, and I’m pretty sure it’s not in focus, but there’s just something about the rain that makes one feel infinite.

endless winter.

Last week I came home from pilates just as a snow storm was setting in. Famished and tired, I bolted upstairs, inhaled an apple and some of my favorite cheese for dinner, and headed out back to capture the falling flakes.

I’m still learning my way around the 6D, but as any photographer knows, everything is new again with a new camera. And there’s something magical about watching the snow swallow the grid of the city. Here are a few of my favorite snaps from the night.

crossing 12th street by meagan kirkpatrick

crossing 12th street by meagan kirkpatrick

Continue reading

cruising altitude.

cruising altitude.

cruising altitude, by meagan kirkpatrick.

These streets will never look the same.

Don’t shoot what it looks like. Shoot what it feels like.  – David Alan Harvey

If You Can Make it Here / Photo by Meagan Kirkpatrick

If You Can Make it Here / Photo by Meagan Kirkpatrick (July 2011)

A few months ago, after shooting almost 50,000 photos on my T2i, I decided it was time to upgrade. Reticent at first, I eventually caved when a friend of mine (who taught me most of what I know about photography), sent me a text saying my “night shots could really use a full frame sensor.”

That was the final straw. I will forever be a nighttime photographer, and my Rebel T2i was like the little red caboose that couldn’t quite get up the hill.

I put my cherished and reliable friend up for sale on Facebook and with seconds of clicking “post,” it was gone.

Continue reading

Still… (Reflections on Photography)

Man Underwater by Ana Vesna

Man Underwater by Anna Vesna

I’ve always appreciated art. My brother’s an incredibly talented illustrator, and I spent almost three years working with Vimeo, where I watched films every day and attended offline screenings regularly. I was profoundly affected by the ability of motion pictures to move people, as redundant as that sounds. They can make you laugh, cry, cringe, and most of all: think.

But since coming to Shutterstock two years ago, spending countless hours among 24 million images, and then going home to my own DSLR, I’ve developed a deep appreciation for the still image.

Portrait of a Girl by Aleshyn Andrei

Portrait of a Girl by Aleshyn Andrei

Continue reading

Blog at WordPress.com.